Saturday, January 13, 2018

Grandmother as a Little Girl (#2 of 52)

This post is based on Amy Johnson Crow's "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" challenge. This week's theme is: FAVORITE PHOTO.

My grandmother, Evelyn, the youngest of five children, was born 10 October 1915. Sadly, when she was only 8 1/2 months old, her mother died. Although Evelyn's father raised the four oldest children, Evelyn was raised by her maternal grandmother, Sallie (Dickson) Ward. Evelyn grew up near family, including her father and siblings, in Perry County, Tennessee.

Photo likely taken in Perry Co., Tenn. in ~1918
Elsie Ward (~15), Sallie (Dickson) Ward (~58), Evelyn Dickson (~2), and Ethel (Ward) Pollock (~24)
This is one of my favorite photos as it is the only known childhood photo of my grandmother, Evelyn (Dickson) Keachle (1915-2004). Wearing a bow and a dress, Little Evelyn is looking down at a pet chicken she is holding. Behind her, with her hands resting on Evelyn's shoulders, is Evelyn's grandmother, Sallie (Dickson) Ward, who raised little Evelyn after the death of her mom.

Photo retouched by JRS (my father)
On the left side of the photo is Elise Jo Ward (1903-1989) who is Evelyn's first cousin/Sallie's granddaughter through Sallie's son, Joe. On the right is Sallie's youngest daughter, Ethel Ward (1893-1987).

I often learn more about a family or situation as I write a blog post. In this case, I did not know when Ethel had died. But, as I did research for this article, I located her death certificate. Now I know that Ethel died at the age of 95 of cardiac arrest in a nursing center in Daviess County, Indiana.

10 comments:

  1. How great that you have a picture of so many family members, especially one that shows two generations!

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    1. I agree! Although this side of the family I do not have very many photos. This photo is actually 3 generations - Sallie, one of her daughters, and two of her granddaughters.

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  2. Sad to think about Evelyn's mother dying when the baby was still, well, a baby. And sad that the siblings weren't all raised together, but I imagine the father just couldn't manage the four older kids plus a toddler.

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    1. Yes, I think that is understandable. I wish I would have asked my grandmother more questions! I know she had a relationship with her sibling even though she was raised apart.

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  3. Your last paragraph is poignant. Writing does open more than what we see on Census records or on a scanned document.

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    1. I agree, Dave. For me, at least, writing really helps me process records and both understand them better and find the "holes" that I need to fill.

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  4. What a sweet picture to have of your grandmother! She looks well cared for.

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    1. Thanks, Lisa. I think she was. My grandmother spoke fondly of her grandmother. I just wish I’d asked her more questions about her early years!

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  5. I have a four generation photo of my grandmother as a baby with her mother, grandmother, and great grandmother - it is priceless. You're right that writing helps us to understand what their lives were like, not just the address they lived at.

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    1. What a treasure! When my daughter was about 1, we had a 4 generation photo made. It is priceless to me! My grandmother died when my daughter was 3.

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