Thursday, July 7, 2016

Tip: A Quick Way to Scan Hundreds of Page

Before heading to Clinton County, Pennsylvania for a quick research trip two weeks ago, some cousins and I hired a researcher to pull some court files regarding our Stewart family. Upon our arrival, we drove to her house, paid her for her work, and received over 200 pages of copies. How exciting!


I doubt I will ever go "paperless" as I love being able to spread papers out and work on them side by side and rearrange them. However, I also need to have digital copies of these documents both for my own research and to share with my cousins.


Today I spent about an hour digitizing all of these documents. The actual scanning only took about 25 minutes with my ScanSnap IX500. It would have been faster if the papers hadn't needed staples removed. After that, I spent another 35 minutes briefly looking at each set so I could label the files. Now, I've saved the files to DropBox and they are ready to be shared!

By the way, this is my craft/genealogy room. We moved into our new house two years ago, but I still usually use my kitchen table for my work. Within the next few months, I'd like to hang up photos, maps, etc, and really start using this as my work room.

2 comments:

  1. How exciting is right! I hope there is lots of good information in those pages for you. I doubt I ever go paperless either, because like you, I really like to spread the papers out side by side. Our daughter recently had a lot of water damage in their home and it reconfirmed to me that it is important to have it all digitized though.

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    Replies
    1. Yikes! Yes, I plan on having digital copies of all my paperwork. But, I have to keep my papers, too!

      I'm still in the midst of my "big" summer class, so I haven't had time to really read through all the documents I received. It will be one of my fall projects!

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