Saturday, January 10, 2015

Have You Listened to Extreme Genes? It's Fascinating!

This week I stumbled upon the Extreme Genes podcasts. It's a radio show that's heard on stations across the country. But, I've NEVER heard of it. And, it's terrific!

Each episode runs 52 minutes and starts with some interesting news items. Then Fisher, the host, does a couple of interviews with experts in the field of genealogy.

I've listened to four episodes which each have two longer interviews. These are 3 of my favorite stories so far:

"Registering Immigrants at Castle Garden in 1866"
(image from Wikipedia)
Episode #43: Pat Mulso's family had passed down a heart-breaking story. In 1860, at the time of their immigration, her ancestors had to leave behind a two year old boy with a priest. But, when the father returned to get the little boy, the priest and the boy were gone. The family never saw their youngest son again! Pat finally tracked down this missing son. An incredible story!

Episode #45: Daniel Swalm discovered that, even though his grandmother spent her entire life in the United States, she died without her American citizenship! The story of how this happened is pretty incredible. And, you might have a grandmother who fell under this same crazy law. An incredible story that eventually led Swalm to the floor of Congress!

Gail Halvorsen (image from Wikipedia)
Episode #70: Col. Gail Halvorsen is better known as "The Berlin Candy Bomber" and "Uncle Wiggly Wings." He's the pilot who, during the Berlin Airlift, started dropping little parachuted packages of chocolate and gum to the children who were starving in West Berlin. He turned 94 in October and is still flies as a co-pilot. He tells the story of why he started the candy drop and talks about his continued friendship with some of the children of West Berlin. Another amazing story!

I can't wait to listen to another episode. I'm loading them onto my iPad and listening to them as I work around the house or do laundry. They're fascinating!

1 comment:

  1. Extreme Genes is a great listen. I agree fully.

    ReplyDelete

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